Sun Exposure and Healthy Skin

Sunscreen-SPF-What-it-means-protectionWe absolutely depend on sunshine for health! When exposed to the sun, our skin produces a plentiful amount of a potent form of Vitamin D, which has hundreds of different roles in the body (including protecting against skin cancer). The dilemma: sun exposure can also damage the skin and eventually lead to skin cancer. Fortunately, when we live in God’s creation the way he intended us to, our skin is healthy enough to endure plentiful amounts of sunshine. Compared to unhealthy skin, healthy skin can absorb more sun rays without incurring damage, and skin is healthy when we eat a Creation-based diet and get enough sunshine! Nearly all fruits and vegetables provide some type of photoprotection for the skin. Regular consumption of healthy foods especially berries, tea, and dark chocolate infuse the body’s cells with polyphenols, flavanols, anthocyanins, and antioxidants that protect the skin against UV rays. Regular consumption is key!

It takes months of maintaining healthy eating habits to improve the skin’s health.The carotenoid family is especially effective at absorbing UV rays and providing anti-oxidant benefits. This includes pigments like beta-carotene, Lycopene, and astaxanthin. Of the carotenoids, Astaxanthin, which is found in salmon and krill (responsible for their red/pink color) is the most powerful. If you don’t eat much salmon or krill oil, astaxanthin can also be found in supplement form. Studies have found that those who regularly consume astaxanthin can stay in the sun longer without getting sun burned. Astaxanthin also has other benefits, such as increased athletic endurance and reduction of inflammation.

Having enough healthy fats in the diet, especially saturated fats and omega-3s, is also important for the skin. Fats are one of the primary building blocks of skin-cell membranes. Be sure to consume fatty fish like salmon or take krill/fish oil pills to meet your daily omega-3 requirement. Good sources of saturated fats include organic butter, organic whole milk, and coconut oil.

A note on topical before/after sun care:

Suncreen can be beneficial, but it has to be the right kind and has to be reapplied regularly. Sunscreen can provide a false sense of security, resulting in burns or excessive sun, so use wisely. Here are the things to know: There is no such thing as a water-proof sunscreen. All sunscreens wear off as as a result of water and toweling, and must be reapplied regularly. Also, many sunscreens use harmful chemicals to absorb the sun’s rays. If you use sunscreen, be sure to only use sunscreen that uses zinc oxide as the sole active ingredient. Zinc oxide is a natural mineral that blocks all types of UV rays. Finally, there is little benefit in using a sunscreen beyond an SPF rating of 30. Anything beyond 30 SPF is primarily a marketing scheme. The sun protection beyond SPF 20-30 drops of exponentially.

Perhaps more important than sunscreen is applying the antioxdiants and phytochemicals listed above, topically. Studies on animals have found that when applied topically after UV exposure, green tea and astaxanthin reduce skin damage. Antioxidants such as Vitamin C and E also have positive effects on the skin. It is easy to make your own before/after sun ointment at home – simply make a 50/50 mix of almond oil and water and add green tea powder (green tea leaves ground in a coffee grinder), astaxanthin (cut open several astaxanthin capsules and insert contents in your oil/water mix), vitamin E, and Vitamin C then shake well before use! Word of caution, the astaxanthin does have a slight pigment to it, so let the ointment absorb into your skin before wearing clothing or touching anything you dont’ want died pink (you can also not add the astaxanthin, but it’s so potent for the skin that I would recommend adding it).

The bottom line is, don’t get burned. You can get more sun without getting burned by improving the health of your skin through proper nutrition and skin care.

Pubmed Sources:

Chocolate study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19735513
Carotenoid study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18803658
Polyphenol study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22070679
Green tea study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21094124

Originally posted 2012-07-19 20:03:00.

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